Arguments for vitro human embryo research

There are two arguments one might marshal against this presumption.

Ethics of Stem Cell Research

Responding to an article that questioned the benefits of adult stem cells, he notes: Clearly, this view is compatible with our suggestion that there is no significant reason not to kill embryos. This suggests that it is some higher-order mental capacity or capacities that grounds the right to life.

Ultimately, it may be possible to generate ES cell lines without destroying embryos Chung et al, ; Klimanskaya et al, Second, a new study of problems in cloning suggests that embryonic stem cells are "surprisingly genetically unstable" in mice and perhaps in humans as well. Similarly, adult Australians and adult Americans can reproduce with one another and produce fertile offspring.

Once our consciences are numbed to the moral wrong of using so-called "spare" human embryos for research, our society will move on to even more egregious abuses. In my view, the United States is a uniquely just society, because it is the first government in the history of mankind in which the rights of the individual supersede the perceived rights of the State.

Surely these embryos, already destined for destruction, could be utilized in research? At present, the best way to address the therapeutic problem is through the creation of a public stem cell bank that represents a genetically diverse pool of stem cell lines Faden et al.

This shows that not all persons can correctly assert that they began their life as a zygote. With these arguments out of the way we can return to the real issue at stake: The embryos slated for destructive research under the NIH guidelines are those deemed to be "in excess of clinical need" by fertility clinics.

In contrast, adult stem cell might not divide fast enough to offer immediate treatment. It can be argued when the reasoning of the fetal organism begins; it cannot be argued when it is human.

This hypothetical case is designed to test our moral intuitions. Some researchers believe that stem cells found in the embryo provide more potential for regenerating tissue than do stem cells taken from older, adult donors.

A single somatic cell or HESC can in principle though not yet in practice develop into a mature human being under the right conditions—that is, where the cell's nucleus is transferred into an enucleated egg, the new egg is electrically stimulated to create an embryo, and the embryo is transferred to a woman's uterus and brought to term.

According to this view, it seems clear that it might be wrong to kill embryos, as some embryos will, if they are not killed, go on to become persons with valuable lives Marquis, Such therapies would be applicable for the treatment of conditions such as spinal cord injury, heart disease, liver disease, and Alzheimer disease.

For these investigators to avoid the charge of complicity in the destruction of embryos, it must be the case that the researchers who derived the HESCs would have performed the derivation in the absence of external demand for the cells Siegel He was one of three delegates who would not approve the U.

Yet a few weeks after that hearing, researchers funded by the NIH and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation published a study indicating that adult bone marrow stem cells "may constitute an abundant and accessible cellular reservoir for the treatment of a variety of neurologic diseases.

Before day 14, the embryo has no central nervous system and therefore no senses. The issue of when a human being begins to exist is, however, a contested one. Embryonic stem cells have greater plasticity, allowing them to treat a wider range of diseases.

Preliminary but promising results have appeared in the use of MSCs in animal models for parkinsonism, spinal cord defects, bone diseases, and heart defects.

Arguments in Support of Embryonic Stem Cell Funding

Many, if not most, who support the use of human embryos for HESC research would likely agree with opponents of the research that there are some circumstances where the use of human embryos would display a lack of appropriate respect for human life, for example, were they to be offered for consumption to contestants in a reality TV competition or destroyed for the production of cosmetics.

Medicine Patients and the Law. The embryos to be destroyed by researchers in this campaign are at the same stage of development as embryos in the womb who have been protected as human subjects in federally funded research since There is a heightened need to protest moral wrongs where those wrongs are socially and legally accepted.

First, it appears to be too sweeping: Fortunately, the essence of these points can be found in a revered document in secular law. From a research standpoint, creating embryos through cloning technologies with cells that are known to have particular genetic mutations would allow researchers to study the underpinnings of genetic diseases in vitro.

This argument might, perhaps, succeed if it were wrong to destroy unwanted embryos in research. It is worth noting that this argument, if sound, would not suffice to show that all or even most HESC research is impermissible, since most investigators engaged in HESC research do not participate in the derivation of HESCs but instead use cell lines that researchers who performed the derivation have made available.

A premise of the argument against killing embryos is that human embryos are human beings. Embryonic stem cell research poses a moral dilemma. Stem cell research, they claim, has the potential to alleviate the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people that are living with often highly debilitating conditions.

For documentation see www. And this difference, so the argument runs, cannot justify treating some of these individuals with moral respect while denying it to others.

This letter was signed by eighty Nobel laureates, and came on the heels of a similar letter signed by organizations sent the previous month.

14 Key Pros and Cons of Embryonic Stem Cell Research

The creators of the spare embryos know that these embryos will be destroyed. We have also argued that there are no significant reasons not to kill unwanted embryos.Some of the human embryos generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF) are treasured by the couples whose gametes were fused to create them; they may fulfil the wish of the prospective parents to have a child.

We call these ‘wanted embryos'. It would be wrong to destroy such embryos in research. What are the arguments against stem cell research? Stem Cell Research I strongly oppose human cloning, as do most Americans.

We recoil at the idea of growing human beings for spare body parts, or creating life for our convenience. Some of the human embryos generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF) are treasured by the couples whose gametes were fused to create them; they may fulfil the wish of the prospective parents to have a child.

We call these ‘wanted embryos'. It would be wrong to destroy such embryos in research. A designer baby is a baby genetically engineered in vitro for specially selected traits, which can vary from lowered disease-risk to gender selection.

Before the advent of genetic engineering and in vitro fertilization (IVF), designer babies were primarily a science fiction concept.

However, the. What are the arguments against stem cell research? Stem Cell Research I strongly oppose human cloning, as do most Americans. We recoil at the idea of growing human beings for spare body parts, or creating life for our convenience.

The Use Of Human Embryos For Stem Cell Research Essays - Ironically, the same organizations oppose embryonic stem cell research due to the massive number of embryos killed, yet far more embryos are destroyed at fertility clinics than by stem cell research (Kinsley, 28).

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Arguments for vitro human embryo research
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